Soursquatch Uncommon Grapefruit Steam Lager

Layger Brewhaus Soursquatch Uncommon Grapefruit Steam Lager label 800x667A Layger Brewhaus Original Recipe

Brewed March, 2016

OBJECTIVE: Moderately malty with toasty and caramel malt flavor. Earthy, spicy, with citrusy hop bite. Dry, crisp, and grainy finish. Aroma of grapefruit. No added acid, sourness, or tartness from fruit.

ACTUAL OUTCOME: Amazing grapefruit aroma before sipping, great nose. Sourness of the grapefruit peel clobbers you from behind. 3 months in captivity mellowed the beast somewhat. Too sour. If you attempt to brew this recipe, zest the grapefruit but do not add the peel!

BREW IT

AKA: Soursquatch California Uncommon, French Mouse Pamplemousse, Steamy Pamplemousse, BitterBomb

Malts:
½ cup DME (for yeast starter)
6 lbs Pale liquid malt extract
1 lbs Victory (aka Biscuit)
8 oz Crystal 40
8 oz Crystal 20
8 oz Caramunich

Yeast:
yeast nutrient (for yeast starter)
Wyeast 2112 California Lager (Temperature Range: 58-68° F)
Start the yeast starter on Thursday evening before brewing on Saturday evening.

Hops:
Bittering hops: 1 oz Northern Brewer (aka Hallertau NB) (1 hour) – woody flavor
Finishing hops: ½ oz Cascade or Centennial (15 min) – citrusy, floral, spicy flavor
Aroma hops: ½ oz Goldings (Kent/UK/US) (5 min) – spicy/earthy aroma
Dry hops: 1 oz Goldings (Kent/UK/US) (7 days) – spicy/earthy aroma

Adjuncts: Five grapefruit to add at dry hop

Mash: (total boil time 80 min)
1. Heat 3 gals water to 165 degrees.
2. Add grains and steep 30 min at 152-156 degrees. Sparge with hot water (up to 170 degrees).
3. Stir in liquid malt extract and bring to a boil.
4. Add bittering hops and boil 60 min.
5. Add finishing hops and boil 15 min.
6. Add aroma hops and boil 5 min.
7. Cool wort to yeast pitch temp on the yeast package.

Fermentation:
Primary fermentation: 18 days at 62 degrees, 2-3 days at 67 (diacetyl rest)
Secondary fermentation: Drop temp 5 degrees per day to 42-45 degrees. Lager for 5 1/2 weeks before dry hopping.

Dry hop:
Begin dry hopping at the beginning of the last lagering week.
Zest five grapefruit. Then slice remaining grapefruit rind into 1” x 2” strips.
Add 1 oz dry hops and grapefruit zest and peel to a nylon bag and soak in carboy for 7 days. Stir once daily. Remove after 7 days. Lager 3 more weeks then keg.

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Kennedy’s Coppertop Ale

Coppertop-Kennedy-Label_800x667A Layger Brewhaus Original Recipe

Always soused by light cream head. Sweet nose followed by a light, watery mouthfeel. Toasty notes. Very #. Pleasantly bitter, leathery finish with light, iced-tea tannins.

The Other Presidential Vice

Coppertop Kennedy was Dave’s first all-grain recipe.

BREW IT

Brew night: Sep 17, 2017
All-grain recipe: 5-6 gallons batch size
9 lbs domestic 2-row pale malt
1 lbs Munich malt
4 oz Victory malt
4 oz aromatic malt
2 oz chocolate malt
1 oz black malt
1 oz roasted barley

1 tsp Irish moss
¼ tsp calcium chloride

½ oz Northern Brewer at 60 min
¼ oz Fuggles at 10 min
¼ oz Fuggles at 5 min

Yeast: White Labs WLP001 California Ale

Heat 4 gals water to 163 F.
Add calcium chloride.
Mash grains at 152 F for 60 min. // 120 min
Sparge at 168 F.
Collect 6 gals of wort and bring to boil. // 6 ½ gals
Add ½ Northern Brewer hops and boil 60 min.
15 min left: add Irish moss
10 min left: ¼ oz Fuggles
5 min left: ¼ oz Fuggles

Cool wort to 70 F, aerate, and pitch yeast. Ferment at 68 F.
Let fermentation stop. Let beer settle for 2-3 days. Rack to secondary.
Kegged: Oct 17
Carbonate to 2.6 volumes of CO2.

// 1.042 OG
// 1.017 Rack = 3.41 alc so far
// 1.019 finishing gravity
= 3.02% alcohol by volume

Apple Pieder: Apple Pie Cider

A Layger Brewhaus Original Recipe

The goal taste profile for this cider was to bulk up the E+D’s Dry Apple Cider No. 41, which turned out too dry and had almost not body due partly to being watered down to hit the goal batch size. Dave also wanted to add some apple pie seasonings and spice in order to enjoy this cider during the late fall. To add some malty heft to this recipe, the solution was simple: add some malted grains!

The actual taste profile was good and fairly close to Dave’s intentions. The cider was a little too tart, so consider reducing the lemon ingredients. The cider had good body and a nice contribution of malt flavors. The cinnamon was present, but not strongly after almost a year in the keg. The nutmeg flavor faded fairly quickly over time in the keg.

BREW IT

Apple Pieder Apple Pie Cider
5 gal batch size (need a 6 ½ gal, wide mouth carboy), 6 weeks start to finish.

INGREDIENTS

For brew night:
White Labs WLP775 English Cider Yeast, $9
1 ¼ tsp Wyeast Yeast Nutrient
6 quarts Santa Cruz Organic 100% Apple Juice (cloudy, not from concentrate, pasteurized, ascorbic acid) = $14
1 gal Tree Top Fresh Pressed 100% pure juice Honeycrisp Apple Juice (cloudy, not from concentrate, pasteurized, no additives) = $2.50
1 gal Tree Top Fresh Pressed 100% pure juice 3 Apple Blend (clear, not from concentrate, pasteurized, no additives) = $2.50
2 lbs dark brown sugar
1 lbs Crystal 60
8 oz Crystal 90
8 oz Munich Light
1 cinnamon stick
24 fl oz (2 cans) Tree Top frozen apple juice concentrate (12 fl oz is about 1 lb.)
1 gal distilled water = $1

For secondary:
3 cinnamon sticks
1 tsp nutmeg
1 tsp allspice
1 Tbsp vanilla
2 oranges
1 small lemon
8 oz raisins
8 oz dried plums
4 lbs of a variety of tart apples (cortland, granny smith, gala, mcintosh, honeycrisp, braeburn, jazz, golden delicious)

DIRECTIONS

1-2 nights before brew night, make a yeast starter. Substitute apple juice for half of the water. Use light dry malt extract powder and yeast nutrient.

Make wort: Heat 1 gal tap water to 158 deg and steep grains for 60 min. Boil yeast nutrient 15 min. Heat 1 gallon sparge water to 180 deg, sparge grain tea.

On brew night, add to a 3 gallon or larger boil kettle and begin heating:
All the apple juice except the frozen concentrate.
2 lbs dark brown sugar (one pound sugar in a 5 gal batch = 1% more alcohol)

While the juice is heating, add 1 ¼ tsp yeast nutrient to 2-3 cups water and boil 10 min then add to the kettle. (1 ¼ tsp yeast nutrient for a 5 gal batch is more than the usual amount of yeast nutrient one would use for beer. Northern Brewer says this compensates for the lack of yeast nutrients in apple juice that are normally present in malt-based wort.)

Bring to 140 F and hold at 140 F for 15 minutes.

Remove from heat then add 2 lbs frozen apple juice concentrate (About 24 fluid ounces. This just adds sugar and helps cool the “wort”.)

Cool the wort to 80 degrees. Sanitize a carboy. Transfer the juice to the carboy. Top with enough distilled water to reach 6 gallons. Pitch the yeast starter.

Primary fermentation (1-2 weeks): Maintain your yeast’s preferred fermentation temperature until fermentation is under way, then drop temp to the low end of your yeast’s preferred temp range. WLP 775 English Cider Ale yeast’s preferred range is 68-75 degrees. Ferment to dry flavor, 1-2 weeks. If fermentation is slow or smells sulfurish, boil then add ½ tsp yeast nutrient every 24 hours until fermentation seems finished. Make sure to boil the yeast nutrient for 10 min before adding to the wort.

Secondary (4 weeks)

Boil some tap water for 15 minutes to sterilize, then remove from heat. Add these to the pot and cover for 15 minutes:
3 cinnamon sticks
1 tsp nutmeg
1 tsp allspice berries or ground allspice
2 Tbsp lemon juice
1 Tbsp vanilla

Needed for dry hop during secondary:
2 oranges
1 small lemon
8 oz raisins
8 oz dried plums
4 lbs of a variety of tart apples (cortland, granny smith, gala, mcintosh, honeycrisp, braeburn, jazz, golden delicious)

Pasteurize (by steaming for 20 minutes):
8 oz raisins
8 oz dried plums
Grain or hop bag
2 cinnamon sticks

Sanitize:
4 lbs of a variety of tart apples (cortland, granny smith, gala, mcintosh, honeycrisp, braeburn, jazz, golden delicious).
2 oranges
1 lemon
Paring knife and cutting board.

Dice the apples, discarding the stems and bottoms. Zest the oranges and lemon. Add the apples, zest, raisins, plums, and cinnamon sticks to the grain or hop bag. Add all to carboy. The addition of the sugars in the apples, raisins, and plums will cause another small fermentation. Every few nights, stir the grain bag with a sanitized metal spoon to make sure all the “dry hop” ingredients are coming into contact with the cider.

With 1 week left in secondary, you can add 1 oz oak chips if you like. Just boil the chips for 15 minutes to sanitize and pour the oak chip water and chips directly into the carboy.

Kegging

Removing the apples, raisins, and plums will drop the batch size back down to around 5 gallons. Do not top with water at this time! That will noticeably dilute your cider, making it watery. Keg as usual. Carbonate at around 12psi at 45 degrees for one week. Serve at 45-50 degrees.

Notes:
Common cider adjuncts: brown sugar, cinnamon, nutmeg.
Less common cider adjuncts: all-spice, clove, cardamom, vanilla, orange, honey, molasses, raisins, dried plums, oak chips
Resources: cidersage.com, ciderschool.com, Northern Brewer cider pdf, http://drinks.seriouseats.com/2011/05/homebrewing-how-to-brew-with-spices.html
http://sweetlandorchard.com/in-lieu-of-raw-cider-for-hard-cider-makers/

Molasses Cookie Porter

A Layger Brewhaus Original Recipe

In 2015 and 2016, Dave felt that Jon was stuck in a Pale Ale brewing rut, so he issued Jon a challenge: Dave would write a mystery recipe giving Jon only the ingredients, Jon would stamp his mark on it by figuring out how to brew it.

Dave started this recipe with a distinct goal taste profile in mind: His favorite Christmas cookie recipe, the molasses cookies that his mom used to make. By following the contours of his mother’s cookie recipe, Dave modified a standard porter ale recipe to turn it into a holiday seasonal brew.

This first challenge brew and collaborative brew (collabrew!) was a success. It was thick, sweet, and rang of molasses.

BREW IT

All-grain
6 gal batch size
7 ¼ gal boil size

WATER
London profile

GRAINS
8 lbs two-row pale malt
1 ½ lbs molasses (add near end of boil)
¾ lbs dark crystal 120L
¾ lbs Victory 25L
½ lbs chocolate malt
½ lbs brown malt
½ lbs flaked barley
¼ lbs smoked malt (if not available, substitute with additional ½ lbs molasses)
¼ lbs black patent malt

YEAST
London Ale, English Ale, Irish Ale

HOPS AND ADJUNCTS (When to add, when to add?)
1 ½ oz East Kent Goldings (or Fuggles)
2 sticks cinnamon (or 5 grams powder)
1 tsp ginger
2-3 pieces of clove

Layger Brewhaus Molasses Cookie Porter

Dave sips a Molasses Cookie Porter.

E+D’s Dry Apple Cider No. 41

A Layger Brewhaus Original Recipe

BREW IT

A Leafblower Cider brewed by Erin and Dave.
5 gal batch size, 6 weeks start to finish, serve between 45-50 degrees.

Goal taste profile: Dry apple cider with some apple flavor.

Actual taste profile after kegging: Definitely has alcohol over 5%. Dry, no sweetness. Some apple flavor left. Some tang from citrus. Body is very thin, almost watery. I shouldn’t have topped it off with water to 6 gallons. Great apple cider aroma, but not a lot of flavor to back it up.

INGREDIENTS

For brew night:
White Labs WLP775 English Cider Yeast, $9
1 ¼ tsp Wyeast Yeast Nutrient
3 quarts Santa Cruz Organic 100% Apple Juice (cloudy, not from concentrate, pasteurized, ascorbic acid) = $8
1 gal Tree Top Fresh Pressed 100% pure juice Honeycrisp Apple Juice (cloudy, not from concentrate, pasteurized, no additives) = $2.50
1 gal Tree Top Fresh Pressed 100% pure juice 3 Apple Blend (clear, not from concentrate, pasteurized, no additives) = $2.50
2 lbs dark brown sugar
24 fl oz (2 cans) Tree Top frozen apple juice concentrate (12 fl oz is about 1 lbs.)
2 gals distilled water = $2

For dry hopping during secondary:
4 lbs of a variety of tart apples (cortland, granny smith, gala, mcintosh, honeycrisp, braeburn, jazz, golden delicious)
8 oz raisins
8 oz dried plums
0.8 oz oak chips
small lemon
an orange

DIRECTIONS

1-2 nights before brew night, make a yeast starter. Substitute apple juice for half of the water. Use light dry malt extract powder and yeast nutrient.

On brew night, add to a 3 gallon or larger boil kettle and begin heating:
All the apple juice except the frozen concentrate.
2 lbs dark brown sugar (one pound sugar in a 5 gal batch = 1% more alcohol)

While the juice is heating, add 1 ¼ tsp yeast nutrient to 2-3 cups water and boil 10 min then add to the kettle. (1 ¼ tsp yeast nutrient for a 5 gal batch is more than the usual amount of yeast nutrient one would use for beer. Northern Brewer says this compensates for the lack of yeast nutrients in apple juice that are normally present in malt-based wort.)

Bring the juice to 165 F and hold for 15 minutes. Remove from heat and add:
1 Tbsp lemon juice
2 lbs frozen apple juice concentrate (About 24 fluid ounces. This just adds sugar and helps cool the “wort”.)

Cool the wort to 80 degrees. Sanitize a carboy then add 1 gallon distilled water to it. Transfer the juice to the carboy. Rinse the kettle with 1 gal distilled water and add it to the carboy. Top with enough distilled water to reach 5 gal batch size. Pitch the yeast starter.

Primary fermentation (1-2 weeks): Maintain 70 degree temp until fermentation is under way, then drop temp to the low end of your yeast’s preferred temp range. Preferred ferm temp for WLP775 English Cider Ale yeast is 68-75 degrees. Ferment to dry flavor, about two weeks. If fermentation is slow or smells sulfurish, boil then add ½ tsp yeast nutrient every 24 hours until fermentation seems finished (up to a total of about 2 ½ tsp for the batch. More than that can add yeast nutrient flavors.). Make sure to boil the yeast nutrient for 10 min before adding to the wort.

Rack to secondary (4+ weeks) at cellar temp (50-70 degrees, whatever ya’ got!).

Dry hop: With 2 weeks left in secondary, add to a hop bag:
Pasteurize 8 oz raisins and 8 oz dried plums by steaming for 15-20 minutes.
Boil 0.8 oz oak chips for 15-2- minutes, then add chips and boiled water to wort.
Sanitize 4 lbs variety of tart apples. Discard stems and bottoms and dice.
Sanitize a small lemon and an orange, then zest. Do not add pith or peel. Just zest.

Keg. Remove the fruit. Top with distilled water to 6 gallons. I ended up adding 1 gallon distilled water to replace the volume removed when I removed the fruit and zest. This was a mistake!

Dave’s brew timeline for this recipe:
Sep 5: brew night, primary around 62 degrees (which was my basement temp)
Sep 8: added ½ tsp yeast nutrient
Sep 10: added ½ tsp yeast nutrient. I added a heater to the room to raise temp to 69 because I realized that the yeast’s preferred ferm temp range is 68-72.
Sep 12: added ½ tsp yeast nutrient. I raised the heater temp to 72.
Sep 18: racked to secondary. Cellar temp ranged from 68-70 during secondary.
Oct 9: Added the dry hop ingredients.
Oct 23: Kegged. Dropped temp to 40 degrees and force carbonated. Later raised temp to 45-50.

Tossed Salad Cucumbers & Celery Pilsner

Layger Brewhaus Tossed Salad label

A Layger Brewhaus Original Recipe

JON: What about this Tossed Salad pilsner? Some whackjob from near Philly brewed it — wit cucumbers and celery!
DAVE: Quit yappin’ about it and pour me a glass, already!
<dramatic sip> 
DAVE: Mm, mm! A man could develop quite a thirst drinkin’ this beer.

Rehydrate the Amish Way

Comments: “It’s like I am at one of those fancy schmancy hotels. You know, the one’s that have that water jug at the desk? They have these cucumbers and things in ’em. It’s like that. Or maybe I could drink it with some caeser or ranch. But seriously, I could drink this one all night. Maybe the whole session, or at least as long as stuff is left on the relish tray.”

“I’ve never been a fan of pilsners, but after this — I’ve never been a fan of pilsners! I’m just kidding. You guys are awesome!”

BREW IT

GOAL TASTE PROFILE:
Addictively refreshing, easy drinking, session pilsner
Pale color and light body
Slightly spicy hop aroma, mild to moderate bitterness ~ 30 IBUs (mostly Saaz)
watery mouthfeel
light cucumber and celery flavor
served very cold
lively carbonation
low alcohol < 4%

48 hours before brew
1. buy all ingredients including 3 gals distilled water
2. boil 2 gals water 20 min, cover, cool overnight
3. make yeast starter

24 hours before brew
4. make 5 gals sanitizer
5. Sanitize a 16 quart or larger kettle and lid. Boil 2 gals tap water, cool to room temp in boil kettle
6. Sanitize knife, cutting board, veggie peeler, nylon bag
7. Remove celery leaves and base of stalks. Carefully wash celery. Make sure the celery is fresh and crisp, not flexible. If flexible, soak it in distilled water for 1 hour before proceeding.
8. Remove rings/jewelry and sanitize hands.
9. Sanitize cukes and celery for 2 minutes in StarSan solution.
10. Peel strips off cukes. Slice partially peeled cukes into discs. Slice discs in half.
11. Add all to nylon bag and carefully place in the boiled and cooled water. Soak overnight for a total soak time of 24 hours.

Brew Day: buy 20 lbs ice, store in cooler

INGREDIENTS

veggies:
2 lbs English cucumbers per 1 gallon water
½ lbs celery per 1 gallon water

For a 5 gallon batch, that’s:
10 lbs English cucumbers
2 ½ lbs celery

(This might have been too much veg for this recipe. It barely fit in my brew kettle for the overnight soak.)

yeast:
First choices: White Labs WLP800 Pilsner Lager Yeast or Wyeast 2278 Czech Pils Yeast
Alternate choices: White Labs WLP802 Czech Budejovice Lager Yeast or Wyeast 2124 Bohemian Lager Yeast

Step by step
1 lbs German Pilsner or CaraPils grain
½ lbs grain: very light Crystal malt grain
Add 1 tsp Burton salts before beginning mash.
Steep grains at 153 deg for 1 hour, sparge.
Add 6 lbs liquid malt extract: Briess Pilsen Light (two 3 lbs containers = $17.50) and bring to a boil. Total boil time will be 1 hour.
At beginning of boil, add 2 ½ oz Saaz hops (~4% alpha acid)
After 30 minutes, add 1 oz Hallertau hops (~4% alpha acid)
After 45 minutes, add 1 tsp Irish Moss.
After 50 minutes, add ½ oz Saaz hops (~4% alpha acid).
After 1 hour, remove the hops. Remove brew kettle from heat.
Cool wort in ice bath to 60 degrees.
Transfer wort to primary fermentation carboy.
Pitch half of the yeast starter.
Remove the veggies from the bucket. Add the room temp cucumber/celery water to the cooled wort.
Pitch the rest of the yeast.
Top off to 5 gals with distilled water.
Move carboy to keezer set at 58 degrees.
Ferment between 50-58 degrees F for about two weeks ending with a 3-day diacetyl rest. Do a diacetyl rest: raise keezer temp to 62 degrees and hold for 2-3 days.

Transfer to secondary.
Drop keezer temp to 55 degrees, then drop 5 degrees per day until you reach 35 degrees F.
Lager the beer for at least 6 weeks.
Keg and force carbonate.
Serve cold.

ACTUAL TASTE PROFILE August 6, 2015

Slightly sweet, watery, some cucumber airiness, celery has faded, lightly hopped and light hop bitterness. Thick and creamy head, some lacing on the empty pint glass. Totally crushable. Serve in chilled glass.

I think it’s a bit underhopped. There’s some hop bitterness but pretty light hop aroma. Not spicy as intended.

Warmer temp: Slightly fruity flavor, less sweet

TOP CUCUMBER FLAVOR PAIRINGS
lime or lemon
watermelon
mint
chili peppers
feta, yogurt, vinegar
tzatziki sauce
rosemary, dill, mustard, pepper, basil, chives

Donkey Dunkel

Layger Brewhaus Donkey Dunkel label

A Layger Brewhaus Original Recipe

DAVE: What about dat one?
JON: Which one?
DAVE: THAT one, the dark one way over dere.
JON: Welllll, I dunno about dat one.
DAVE: Whaddya mean? What’s wrong wit it?
JON: Get dis — it’s called “Donkey Dunkel”.
DAVE: Ya’ kiddin’ me?
JON: Would I do that?
DAVE: Psh! C’mon now. Let’s give it the old heave ho. We’ll try it together.
<pour, dramatic sip, look>
BOTH: Dis lager kicks ass!

Grab an ass.

Comments: “This reflects the golden age of beers – unbelievable flavor and intensity…just like the dames in this joint.”

BREW IT

6 lbs Briess Munich liquid malt extract
1/2 lbs Caramunich malt
1/2 lbs Victory malt
1/2 lbs Crystal 60 malt

1 oz Tettnanger (60 minutes), Alpha 6%
1 oz Saaz (15 minutes), Alpha 3.4%
1/2 oz German Hallertau (5 minutes), Alpha 4.5%

4 tsp nutmeg (1 minute boil)

Munich Lager Wyeast 2308

You could also use: Bavarian Lager Wyeast 2206, Southern German Lager WLP 838, Bohemian Lager Wyeast 2124

1. Boil 2 1/2 gals for 10 minutes. Remove from heat. Add 1/2 gals tap water and let cool to 165 degrees.
2. Add cracked grains. Soak at 154-159 degrees for 45 minutes.
3. Sparge grains with boiling water.
4. Stir in liquid malt extract and bring all to boil.
5. Add 1 oz Tettnanger and boil 45 minutes.
6. While boiling, clean and sanitize carboy and funnel.
7. Add 1 oz Saaz and boil 10 minutes.
8. Add 1/2 oz Hallertau and boil 4 minutes.
9. Add 4 tsp nutmeg and boil 1 minute.
10. Remove all from heat. Remove all hop socks. Cover kettle with lid.
11. Prepare ice bath. Cool wort to yeast pitch temperature 65-70 degrees.
12. Pour wort into carboy.
13. Pitch yeast.
14. Top off to 5 gals.
15. Cap and transfer to 48-56 degree keezer (depending on yeast strain preference).
16. Ferment 1-2 weeks.
17. Consider diacetyl rest depending on yeast strain.
18. Transfer to secondary.
19. Decrease temp 5 degrees per day down to lagering temp of 35 degrees for 4-6 weeks.
20. Keg.

Layger Lager Bavarian Helles

A Layger Brewhaus Original Recipe

The goal for this lager was a light and refreshing Bavarian-style Helles. It did not go very well!

BREW IT

Munich Helles
July 2014

MALTS
6 lbs Pilsen liquid malt extract (Briess) (boil 60 min)
2 lbs German pilsner grain (Weyermann) (Steep 30-60 min at 150-170 degF)
1 cup light dry malt extract or liquid malt extract for the yeast starter

HOPS
2 oz Hallertau leaf hops (HopUnion) (1.5 oz for 60 min boil, .5 oz for 5 min boil)

YEAST
2124 Bohemian Lager (Wyeast smackpack) You will need to buy two packages or make a yeast starter to make a lager.

ADJUNCTS
1 teaspoon Irish moss (helps clarify proteins out of the wort)

STEPS

24-36 hours before beginning, make a yeast starter:
1. Activate the yeast you will use. Let sit for 3-4 hours.
2. Sanitize a growler bottle, rubber stopper, bubbler, scissors, and the sauce pan lid.
3. Combine 1 cup dry malt extract or liquid malt extract and 6 cups water in a clean sauce pan. Boil 15 min.
4. Cover the sauce pan with the lid and cool it in a bath.
5. Let cool to room temp then pour into sanitized jar and cover the opening with foil.
6. Sanitize the yeast smack pack, open it with scissors. Pour into the jar.
7. Seal with rubber stopper and bubbler.
8. Leave at room temp for 24-36 hours, occasionally swirling the jar to oxygenate the wort and help yeast to reproduce.
9. During yeast reproduction, the liquid will look milky. When the yeast have finished reproducing, they will fall to the bottom of the jar and the liquid will clarify.

WORT & FERMENTATION

1. While beginning the wort, cool the yeast starter to 50 degF.
2. Add 3 gals water to a pot and bring to a boil for 15 minutes to boil off chlorine, etc.
3. Remove from heat and let cool to 170 degF.
4. Add the German pilsner grain. Soak the grains for 30 -60 min between 150-170 degF.
5. Rinse and remove the grains, discard.
6. Bring the water back to boiling.
7. Add the Pilsen liquid malt extract and bring the water back to boiling.
8. Once boiling, add 1.5 oz Hallertau hops.
9. Boil for 45 minutes. During the boil, do these things:
i. sanitize the primary carboy, funnel, and steel spoon
ii. prepare the ice bath
iii. cool the yeast starter to 50 degF
10. After the 45 min boil, add 1 tsp of Irish Moss (in a sock). Boil for 10 minutes.
11. Then add 1/2 oz Hallertau hops (in a sock). Boil for 5 minutes.
12. Immediately remove the Irish Moss and hops, discard.
13. Chill the wort as quickly as possible in a cold bathtub with lots of ice. Chill down to 50 degF.
14. While the wort is chilling, add 2 gallons of 50 degree tap water to the sanitized carboy.
15. Pour out excess liquid from the yeast starter jar, keeping the yeast slurry and enough liquid to help pour it out. Pitch the yeast slurry into the wort. Stir well.
16. Then pour the yeasted wort into the primary carboy (which should contain 2 gals of cool tap water). Slosh it around a bit.
17. Ferment for 1-2 weeks at 50 degF until the bubbling slows and the bubble cap sinks to the bottom of the carboy.
18. Raise the temp to 55 -60 degF for 2 days to let the yeast eat the diacetyls.
19. Transfer to a secondary carboy.
20. Reduce the temp by 2 degrees per day to 35 degF. Lager at 35 degF for 4 weeks.
21. Keg.

Bron Yr Aur Nut Brown Ale

Layger Brewhaus Beer Label - Bron Yr Aur NutBrown Ale
A Layger Brewhaus Original Recipe

Hello, there. I caught you smilin’ at me. I’m Bron Yr Aur, a Nut Brown Ale brewed the way I should be, with the wettest hard water, caramelized grains, a touch of barley and chocolate malts. Mingling with the acrid autumnal Golding hops, this is an ale that will always treat you right, no matter the occasion, dish, or time of day.

When you smile upon the Bron, the road you choose is always right.

BREW IT

MALTS

6 lbs Pale Liquid Extract
1.5 lbs Biscuit or Victory malt (grain)
1 lbs light brown sugar (Dave will get from grocery store)
.5 lbs Crystal 60 (grain)
.5 lbs Caramunich (grain)
.5 lbs Caravienne (grain)
One-tenth lbs Chocolate malt (grain)
One-tenth lbs roasted barley
One-tenth lbs Greg Mault

HOPS

1 oz Goldings (if they’re out of Goldings, then Fuggles) (75% for boil, 25% for finishing)

YEAST

European Ale

ADJUNCTS

1 palm-sized bag of calcium chloride
1 palm-sized bag of calcium sulfate (aka gypsum)
1/2 teaspoon Irish moss

Whistlestop Chili Steam

Layger Brewhaus Beer Label - Whistlestop Chili SteamA Layger Brewhaus Original Recipe

Longtime Layger Brewfriends may recognize this mashup between Steampunk Lager and Flamin’ Mamie Chili Honey Pilsner from Oktobertheseventhfest Part Drei in 2008. Whistlestop drinks smooth and spicy like Steampunk yet ratchets up the heat in the back of the mouth. Get steamed!

Recipe has hopped on the last train to Mexico…

Witch Hazelnut Amber

Layger Brewhaus Beer Label - Witch Hazelnut Amber AleA Layger Brewhaus Original Recipe

Beer Beta:

Style: Amber Ale
Malts: Pale malt extract, Karo dark syrup, clover honey, brown rice syrup, Crystal, Victory
Hops: Willamette, Fuggles
Yeast: European Ale
Other: 12 oz Odell’s 90 Shilling, roasted hazelnuts

Questions? Ask the Brewer: Dave

Octobertheseventhfest comments: Missing!

BREW IT

Based very loosely on the “Stunreeb Lezah Rebma” (“amber hazel beernuts” backwards) recipe submitted to Layger Brewhaus by Ben Wolpoff of Harvey and Wolpoff Breweries. (Oct, 2007)

Overview (courtesy B. Wolpoff):
With such a sophisticated sounding title, this beer stands strong with it’s complex, sophisticated, and downright superior flavor and nutrition. While most beer can claim to be high in carbohydrates and carbon dioxide, a leading cause of deaths by suffocation, Stunreeb Lezah Rebma, or SLR for short, can tout a completely unscientifically founded and logically derived rich protein content low in saturated fat. Moreover, SLR could be said to contain significant amounts of thiamine and vitamin B6, with a lesser strenght in other B vitamins. While not proven, this is a resolute fact of superior nutrition through beer. SLR stands with tradition being a fantastic amber ale for the late fall season. It’s hazelnut heart is harvested in mid fall as the leaves begin to change and the weather cools. Even without any support SLR stands tall and steadfast in its amazing claim to boost the immune system and help mankind resist the diseases that wreak utter havoc during the changing of seasons. SLR is liquid nutrition.

How to store hazelnuts: The best place to store shelled hazelnuts is in the freezer at 27F or less. They will last up to two years if stored in plastic bags or containers. The next best place to store shelled hazelnuts is in the refrigerator at 32-35F. They last up to one year if packaged in airtight plastic bags or containers so they do not pick up odors. Before using, let nuts warm to room temperature in unopened bag.

Ingredients:
2 lbs hazelnuts
4 lbs John Bull Premium Canadian Ale (Layger: 12 oz Odell’s 90 Shilling, 16 fl oz Karo dark syrup, 16 oz clover honey, 1 lb brown rice syrup)
2 lbs pale malt extract
.5 lbs Crystal 60 malt grain
.5 lbs Victory malt grain
2 oz Willamette hops (boiling)
1 oz Fuggles or any Goldings hops (aroma)
1 package European Ale yeast
1/2 cup corn sugar

Instructions:
Get 2 gallons water on the way to 165degF.
Crack the grains.
Preheat oven to 275F.
Toast/roast the hazelnuts. Spread the hard nuts in a shallow baking pan and roast in the preheated oven 20-30 minutes, until the skin cracks and the nut meat turns light golden. To remove the skins, pour hot nuts in the center of a rough kitchen terry towel. Pull the towel up around the nuts and twist tightly. Let stand to steam for about 5 minutes then rub the warm nuts in the towel until most of the skins are removed.
When water has reached 165 degF, add the cracked grains in a sock.
Steep 30 minutes at 165 degF. Sparge.
Bring the water to a boil and then stir in the malt extracts.
Add all the Willamette hops.
Boil 15 minutes.
Add about a ½ lb. of toasted nuts and ½ oz. of the aroma hops.
Boil 10 minutes.
Add remaining hazelnuts and hops to hot wort. (If you plan to do a secondary fermentation, add just half of the remaining nuts and hops now and the rest during the transfer to the secondary.)
Cool the kettle in an ice bath for 15-20 minutes.
Transfer to primary FERMENTOR and top off with cold water to 5 gallons.
When wort has cool to 70 deg F, add the yeast.
Bottle after primary fermentation has slowed (about 1 week, maybe longer for European Ale yeast).

Noggin Knocker Roggenbier Amber Rye Ale

Layger Brewhaus Beer Label - Noggin Knocker Roggenbier Amber Rye Ale

A Layger Brewhaus Original Recipe 

Beer Beta:

Style: Amber Rye Ale
Malts: Amber Malt Extract, Light Dry, Crystal, Rye Flakes, Cara Pils
Hops: Centennial, Mount Hood
Yeast: American Ale
Other: Irish moss

Questions? Ask the Brewer: Dave

Octobertheseventhfest comments: Missing!

BREW IT

Ingredients:
5 lb Amber Malt Extract Syrup
1 lb Light Dry Malt Extract
1 lb Crystal 60L
1 lb rye flakes
8 oz Cara Pils
bittering hops: 1 oz Centennial pellet (10.5% alpha acid)
aroma hops: 0.25 oz Mount Hood pellet (5.0% alpha acid)
Wyeast #1056 American Ale, 1.0
1 ounce Irish Moss

Instructions:
1. Bring 1 ½ gallons water to 180 deg or so. Water should be steaming but not boiling.
2. Crush the grains, add to grain sock, add to water.
3. Steep the grains 30 minutes.
4. Remove the pot from heat. Sparge the grains.
5. Pour the amber malt extract and the light dry malt into the pot while stirring. Once thoroughly mixed, bring the pot to a boil.
6. Add the bittering hops: 1 oz. Centennial (10.5% alpha acid).
7. Boil 45 minutes.
8. Add 1 oz Irish moss.
9. Boil 10 minutes.
10. Add the aroma hops: .25 oz Mount Hood (5% alpha acid).
11. Boil 5 minutes.
12. Remove pot from heat. Discard hops.
13. Cool water to 85degF.
14. Add 3 gallons cold water to bring the total volume up to 5 gallons.
15. Hydrate the yeast.
16. Add the yeast when the water temp is between 65ºF-75ºF.

Sudsy Joe’s Motor Oil Coffee Cream Imperial Stout

Layger Brewhaus Beer Label - Sudsy Joe's Motor Oil Coffee Cream Imperial StoutA Layger Brewhaus Original Recipe

Beer Beta:

Style: Imperial Stout
Malts: dark malt, roasted barley, crystal 120, chocolate, crystal 40, Victory, black patent
Hops: Chinook, Saaz, Tettnanger
Yeast: Irish Ale
Other: gypsum, lactose, cold-pressed coffee concentrate

Perfect lubrication for common social situations

Questions? Ask the Brewer: Dave

Octobertheseventhfest comments:

“Malted barley and light coffee subtleties are the first aromas that reach your senses. The second is the full bodied depth of this beer’s flavor. This brew will lubricate any social event.”—Greg

“Like an irish wench gone black, she refuses to go back, lingering haunting long after the last swallow.”—JK

“Do they sell this at Starbucks?? This would be the perfect start to every morning!!”—Matt & Jess

BREW IT

This recipe is a substantially modified version of the Layger Brewhaus Imperial March Stout recipe which was based on the “88 Draught Stout” recipe from a recipe book.

Ingredients:

MALTS AND GRAINS:
6 lbs dark malt extract syrup
.5 lbs roasted barley (flavors: rich, roasty, sweet, grainy)
.5 lbs crystal 120 malt (flavors: toffee)
.5 lbs chocolate malt (flavors: chocolate)
.5 lbs crystal 40 malt (flavors: moderate caramel)
.25 lbs Victory malt (flavors: warm, toasty, nutty)
.25 lbs black patent malt (flavors: toasty, smokey)

52 ounces cold-pressed coffee concentrate, filtered (decaf): This must be made at least 12 hours before brewing. Add .75 lbs of coarsely ground, decaf coffee into a clean stock pot. Add 52 ounces cold water. Stir until all coffee grounds are soaking wet and no dry pockets remain. Soak for 12 hours (do not heat). Filter using coffee filter into a separate container. Discard the spent coffee grounds without sparging. Consider filtering the coffee concentrate a second time to remove coffee silt. This 52 ounces of coffee concentrate would normally be mixed 3:1 before being drunk, yielding 156 ounces of drinkable cold-pressed coffee. 156 ounces is ~25% of the total, 5 gallon (640 oz.) wort volume.

HOPS:
.5 oz. Chinook hops 12.5% alpha (boil 80 min) (flavors: acidic, bittering)
.5 oz. Saaz hops, 6.8% alpha (boil 5 min) (flavors: spicy, herbal)
.5 oz. Tettnanger, 4.2% alpha (boil 3 min) (flavors: general hoppiness)

YEAST/PRIMING SUGAR:
1084 Irish Ale yeast
.75 cup corn sugar, for priming

ADJUNCTS:
stay at 2 teaspoons gypsum (flavors: hardens water)
increase to 8 oz. lactose (flavors: creaminess, mouth-watering)

Instructions:
1. Add gypsum to 2 gallons water, stir well. Let sit.
2. Crack the grains. In a separate pot, combine 1 gallon of water with the roasted barley, the crystal malts, the chocolate malt, the Victory malt, and the black patent malt and heat to 175 deg F. Steep at 175 deg F for one hour.
3. 30 minutes into the steeping, begin heating the 2 gallons of gypsum water.
4. After the grains have steeped for an hour, sparge the grains and add this fluid to the 2 gallons gypsum water.
5. Add the malt extract to the gypsum water.
6. Bring to a boil, add .5 oz Chinook hops.
7. Boil for 75 minutes.
8. We are unsure when to add the lactose. During the April ’08 brewing, Dave added the lactose directly to the room temperature coffee concentrate and it all settled to the bottom. Even vigorous stirring didn’t dissolve the lactose into the liquid. When the wort had cooled to 100 degF, Dave added the coffee/lactose mixture and stirred, but the lactose still didn’t seem to dissolve fully. 8 oz is a lot of lactose, so maybe it’s just a quantity issue, however, we recommend adding the lactose at the end of the boil to help it dissolve. If this doesn’t work, consider adding the lactose when adding the malt extracts next time. Still, make sure not to add the cold-pressed coffee concentrate to hot water or it will become bitter/acidic. Add the coffee as directed below.
9. Add .5 oz Saaz hops.
10. Boil 2 minutes, then add .5 oz Tettnanger hops.
11. Boil 3 minutes, then remove from heat.
12. Cool the kettle in an ice bath for 30 minutes, then add cold-pressed coffee concentrate.
13. When wort has cooled to 70 degrees F, add the yeast, stirring and aerating well.
14. Transfer to primary FERMENTOR and top off with cold water to 5 gallons.
15. Ferment 21 days at 68 deg F, then bottle.

Flamin’ Mamie Chili Honey Pilsner

Layger Brewhaus Beer Label - Flamin' Mamie Chili Honey PilsnerA Layger Brewhaus Original Recipe

Beer Beta:

Style: Pilsner
Malts: light malt extract, honey
Hops: Czech Saaz
Yeast: Czech Pils
Other: roasted ancho chili peppers, Irish moss

SWEET HEAT

Questions? Ask the Brewer: Dave

Octobertheseventhfest comments:

“Mamie would make Roger Rabit say ‘Jessica Who?’ VERY subtle hints of spice in a smooth, slightly hoppy brew.”—Kris & Lori

“This beer is exciting. It makes your tongue tingle on a journey from sweet to spicy bite. I enjoy the fact that the same mouthfull changes over time. It never gets too spicy. It hurts, but it stays with you. Every sip reminds me of eating taquitos, chimichanga, and fried ice cream. When I drink this…. I am South of the Border.”—Ben W.

BREW IT

This recipe is based on the Mickviray Papazian Pilsener from Charlie Papazian’s book, Microbrewed Adventures. Papazian’s recipe does not include honey or peppers.

Ingredients:
6 lbs light malt extract
1-3 ancho chili peppers (or pablanos)
.75 lbs honey
4.25 oz. Czech Saaz hops 4% alpha
.25 tsp. powdered Irish moss
Wyeast Czech Pils yeast #2278 or White Labs Pilsner Lager yeast WLP800
.75 cup corn sugar

Instructions:
1. Add malt extract, honey, and .75 oz. hops to 2.5 gallons hot water. Stir well. Bring to boil.
2. Boil 15 min. and then add 1 oz. hops.
3. Boil 40 min. and then add 1.5 oz. hops.
4. Boil 18 min. and then add 1 oz. hops.
5. Boil 2 min. and turn off heat (total boiling time will have been 75 minutes).
6. Cool the wort in an ice bath for a half hour or so.
7. Strain/sparge hops. Pour wort into Fermentor and top off with cold water to 5 gallons.
8. Aerate the wort (stir vigorously or use spray nozzle when filling to 5 gallons).
9. Wash, then roast the chili peppers until slightly browned (toaster oven works fine). Cut into strips. Remove and discard seeds. Add pepper strips to fermenting bucket.
10. When wort reaches 70 degrees F, add the yeast.
11. Seal the Fermentor and ferment for a week or so.
12. Transfer to bottling bucket, add priming sugar, bottle for at least 4 weeks.